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Cocaine use might increase HIV vulnerability

New research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology suggests that cocaine makes quiescent CD4 T cells susceptible to HIV resulting in significant infection and new virus production.

Cocaine-Detox-Hotline

Bethesda, MD — Cocaine use may increase one’s vulnerability to HIV infection, according to a new research report published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology. In the report, scientists show that cocaine alters immune cells, called “quiescent CD4 T cells,” to render them more susceptible to the virus, and at the same time, to allow for increased proliferation of the virus.

“We ultimately hope that our studies will provide a better understanding of how drugs of abuse impact how our body defends itself against disease,” said Dimitrios N. Vatakis, Ph.D., the study’s senior author and a scientist with UCLA’s Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology and the UCLA AIDS Institute. “Such discovery can significantly improve the quality of life of drug users.”

To make this discovery, scientists collected blood from healthy human donors and isolated quiescent CD4 T cells, and exposed them to cocaine and subsequently infected them with HIV. Following infection, researchers monitored the progression of HIV’s life cycle and compared this progression against that of untreated cells. They found that cocaine rendered this subset of CD4 T cells susceptible to HIV, resulting in significant infection and new virus production.

“The co-epidemics of elicit drug use and infectious disease are well documented, though typically this connection is thought to occur through lifestyle choices and increased exposure,” said John Wherry, Ph.D., Deputy Editor of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology. “What often does not come to mind is that drugs such as cocaine may be helping to fuel infections in this high-risk population by altering the immune system. These new studies are an important advance documenting how cocaine use may increase a person’s vulnerability to HIV and further highlighting the need for improved education for both HIV prevention and drug abstinence.”

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The Journal of Leukocyte Biology publishes peer-reviewed manuscripts on original investigations focusing on the cellular and molecular biology of leukocytes and on the origins, the developmental biology, biochemistry and functions of granulocytes, lymphocytes, mononuclear phagocytes and other cells involved in host defense and inflammation. The Journal of Leukocyte Biology is published by the Society for Leukocyte Biology.

Details: Sohn G. Kim, James B. Jung, Dhaval Dixit, Robert Rovner, Jr., Jerome A. Zack, Gayle C. Baldwin, and Dimitrios N. Vatakis. Cocaine exposure enhances permissiveness of quiescent T cells to HIV infection. J Leukoc Biol, October 2013 94:835-843; doi:10.1189/jlb.1112566 ; http://www.jleukbio.org/content/94/4/835.abstract

Cocaine use may increase HIV vulnerability

New research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology suggests that cocaine makes quiescent CD4 T cells susceptible to HIV resulting in significant infection and new virus production.

Bethesda, MD — Cocaine use may increase one’s vulnerability to HIV infection, according to a new research report published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology. In the report, scientists show that cocaine alters immune cells, called “quiescent CD4 T cells,” to render them more susceptible to the virus, and at the same time, to allow for increased proliferation of the virus.

“We ultimately hope that our studies will provide a better understanding of how drugs of abuse impact how our body defends itself against disease,” said Dimitrios N. Vatakis, Ph.D., the study’s senior author and a scientist with UCLA’s Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology and the UCLA AIDS Institute. “Such discovery can significantly improve the quality of life of drug users.”

To make this discovery, scientists collected blood from healthy human donors and isolated quiescent CD4 T cells, and exposed them to cocaine and subsequently infected them with HIV. Following infection, researchers monitored the progression of HIV’s life cycle and compared this progression against that of untreated cells. They found that cocaine rendered this subset of CD4 T cells susceptible to HIV, resulting in significant infection and new virus production.

“The co-epidemics of elicit drug use and infectious disease are well documented, though typically this connection is thought to occur through lifestyle choices and increased exposure,” said John Wherry, Ph.D., Deputy Editor of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology. “What often does not come to mind is that drugs such as cocaine may be helping to fuel infections in this high-risk population by altering the immune system. These new studies are an important advance documenting how cocaine use may increase a person’s vulnerability to HIV and further highlighting the need for improved education for both HIV prevention and drug abstinence.”

###
The Journal of Leukocyte Biology publishes peer-reviewed manuscripts on original investigations focusing on the cellular and molecular biology of leukocytes and on the origins, the developmental biology, biochemistry and functions of granulocytes, lymphocytes, mononuclear phagocytes and other cells involved in host defense and inflammation. The Journal of Leukocyte Biology is published by the Society for Leukocyte Biology.

Details: Sohn G. Kim, James B. Jung, Dhaval Dixit, Robert Rovner, Jr., Jerome A. Zack, Gayle C. Baldwin, and Dimitrios N. Vatakis. Cocaine exposure enhances permissiveness of quiescent T cells to HIV infection. J Leukoc Biol, October 2013 94:835-843; doi:10.1189/jlb.1112566 ; http://www.jleukbio.org/content/94/4/835.abstract

About The Contributor
The editorial staff of Recovery First is comprised of addiction content experts from American Addiction Centers. Our editors and medical reviewers have over a decade of cumulative experience in medical content editing and have reviewed thousands... Read More